October 25

Review roundup

AbourezkAdvise and Dissent
Memoirs of an Ex-Senator
by James G. Abourezk with a Foreword by Fred Harris
Reviewed in Capital Journalism

“The first Arab American ever to serve in the U.S. Senate, Abourezk was strident in his criticism of U.S. foreign policy on Israel and the Palestinians, for example, as well as a harsh critic of domestic policy on American Indian issues.”
-Lance Nixon
______________________________________________________________________

The New Reform Judaism
KaplanChallenges and Reflections
by Dana Evan Kaplan with a Foreword by Rabbi Eric H. Yoffie and an Afterword by Rabbi Rick Jacobs
Reviewed in Publishers Weekly

“The stresses that challenge Reform Judaism, America’s largest Jewish denomination, are examined by Kaplan, a Reform rabbi and author of three previous books… After chapters on the need for a Reform Jewish theology and the history of the Reform movement, Kaplan explores its confrontation with contemporary issues of worship, practice, values, and ethics.”
-PW

Read an excerpt from the book
________________________________________________________________________________________

Wheels Stop
HoustonThe Tragedies and Triumphs of the Space Shuttle Program, 1986-2011
by Rick Houston with a Foreword by Jerry Ross
Reviewed in Publishers Weekly

“The Challenger and Columbia disasters receive their grim chapters along with another on the greatest achievement—launching and caring for the Hubble Space Telescope. Readers will find the section on American–Russian space flights absorbing, and will be mourning the end of the shuttle program by the final chapter.”
-PW

Read an excerpt from the book
________________________________________________________________________________________

SalkinThe Gods Are Broken!
The Hidden Legacy of Abraham
by Rabbi Jeffrey K. Salkin
Reviewed in Jewish Herald Voice

“Rabbi Salkin maintains that the midrash of the breaking of the idols is not simply a story about rebellion against the religious mores of the day. The midrash serves as a typology illuminating three paths to the sacred: religious absolutism (pre-modern), religious relativism (modern) and Abraham’s model of a religion that has the courage to challenge (post-modern).”
-Aaron Howard

Read an excerpt from the book