October 11

Review roundup

BlackMaking the American Body
by Jonathan Black
Reviewed in Publishers Weekly

“The antecedents of the American fitness
industry are varied and fascinating, and journalist Black (Yes, You Can!:
Behind the Hype and Hustle of the Motivation Biz
) does a superb job of
chronicling them—from the early days of body builders on Santa Monica’s Muscle
Beach, through the creation of gyms as spare as “dungeons,” to the high-end
health clubs of today.”
-PW

Read an excerpt from the book
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Football RevolutionWright
by Bart Wright
Reviewed in The Wall Street Journal

“For
avid fans, Football Revolution will inspire friendly arguments over
the staying power of the spread—and what might supersede it someday. But all
readers will enjoy the book’s vivid profiles and marvel at the amazing
ingenuity of a game that is supposed to favor brawn over brains.”
-Bob Boyles

Read an excerpt from the book
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Kaplan

501 Baseball Books Fans Must
Read Before They Die

by Ron Kaplan
Reviewed in Baseball America

“Baseball book enthusiasts
may be familiar with Kaplan from his website, Ron Kaplan’s Baseball Bookshelf
(www.ronkaplansbaseballbookshelf.com), where he has been blogging about the
sport’s literature and other related topics since 2006. With thousands of posts
on countless hundreds of books (he also writes about movies and baseball
paraphernalia on occasion), he has established himself as the go-to resource
for reviews on books new and old alike.”
-James Bailey

Read an excerpt from the book
________________________________________________________________________________________

It’s Not Going to Kill You,
and Other Stories

Flanagan_ItsNotGoingtoKillYou
by Erin Flanagan
Reviewed in Booklist

“Like holographic slivers, her stories contain
a breadth and scope usually found in novels, telling whole lifetimes in the
span of after-dinner coffee. Thematically, her stories are linked by the
hard-earned realization that the most important moments, those that change our
lives, are the ones that seem the most inconsequential at the time.”
-Greg Baldino

Read an excerpt from the book