News and Reviews

Books

The Wax Pack

Brad Balukjian

Featured in the New York Times:

“Brad Balukjian tore open a pack of 1986 Topps baseball cards, chewed the stale, brittle bubblegum and then planned a road trip most sports fans could only dream about . . . The self-funded trip in 2015 cost about $8,000 and took him and his 2002 Honda Accord across 30 states over 11,341 miles in 48 days—fueled by 123 cups of coffee. What Balukjian learned is vividly documented in his recently published book, The Wax Pack, which has quickly become a favorite among baseball-hungry fans during the coronavirus pandemic.”

Radiance

Danny Siegel

Review on Reform Judaism:

“This anthology of his writings is a well-deserved tribute to one of our Jewish community’s creative writers and builders . . . Siegel’s most endearing gift, though, may be his talent for introducing us to unusual individual, both in North America and in Israel, whom we might never have met or to whom we would otherwise not have paid notice.”

How to Survive Death and Other Inconveniences

Sue William Silverman

Review from Lit Hub:

“Honoring subconscious logic, How to Survive Death and Other Inconveniences makes the gambit that the mysteries of the self are both keys to understanding and uncertainties to be celebrated. We become who we are without being fully conscious of our choices—probing those choices won’t give us easy answers, but the discoveries along the way will be illuminating and well worth the necessary befuddlements.”

Issei Baseball

Robert K. Fitts

Featured in JQ Magazine:

“A book like Issei Baseball is packed with surprises . . . While baseball has a long history in Japan, the sport has just as rich of a pedigree in Japanese American communities. Issei Baseball is an encyclopedic look into a game that brought pride to a wider group of people.”

Blood in the Borderlands

David C. Beyreis

Review on Civil War Books and Authors:

“Author David Beyreis ‘incorporates new material about the women in the family and the ‘forgotten’ Bents and shows how indigenous power shaped the family’s business and political strategies as the family adjusted to American expansion and settler colonist ideologies.‘ Kudos to the person who came up with the title, too, as it is an excellent combination of alliteration and double meaning!”

Authors

Jacqueline Saper

Author op-ed in The Times of Israel.

Sue Silverman

Author interview with Bitch Media and on the Chicago Psychology Podcast.

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