75th Anniversary of the Nuremberg Trials ending

Today marks the 75th year anniversary of the ending of the Trial of Major War Criminals, the best known of the Nuremberg trials, held in Nuremberg, Germany. These trials were held from November 20, 1945 to October 1, 1946. During the proceedings, twenty-four individuals were indicted and six Nazi organizations were determined to be criminal. Following the Trial of Major War Criminals, there were twelve additional trials held at Nuremberg. These additional trials were also known as the Subsequent Nuremberg Proceedings and took place from December 1946 to April 1949. For further reading on this historical event, check out the books below for insight to the Nuremberg Trials.

Atrocities on Trial: Historical Perspectives on the Politics of Prosecuting War Crimes (Nebraska, 2008) edited by Patricia Heberer and Jürgen Matthäus and with foreword by Michael R. Marrus illuminates a dark and timely subject and helps us to understand the ongoing struggle to hold accountable those who perpetrate crimes against humanity. The essays are organized into four sections: the history of war-crime trials from Weimar Germany to just after World War II; the sometimes diverging Allied efforts to come to terms with the Nazi concentration camp system; the ability of postwar society to confront war crimes of the past; and the legacy of war-crime trials in the twenty-first century.

Pauline Frederick Reporting: A Pioneering Broadcaster Covers the Cold War (Potomac Books, 2015) by Marilyn S. Greenwald and with foreword by Marlene Sanders is the biography of the life and career of the first woman to become a network news correspondent. After no less an authority than Edward R. Murrow told her there was no place for her in broadcasting, Pauline Frederick (1908–90) cracked the good old boys’ club through determination and years of hard work, eventually becoming a trusted voice to millions of television viewers. During Frederick’s nearly fifty years as a journalist, she interviewed a young Fidel Castro, covered the Nuremberg trials, interpreted diplomatic actions at the United Nations, and was the first woman to moderate a presidential debate. 

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