September Book Deals

UNP is excited to announce these forthcoming projects from our team of acquiring editors. All titles listed here are working titles only and are subject to change before publication. The acquiring editor is in parentheses.

We look forward to editing, producing, designing, and marketing these books, and working with the authors as we move toward publication of each.

Forthcoming from University of Nebraska Press

For the trade

Nebraska

Kim Adrian, The Twenty-Seventh Letter of the Alphabet (Alicia Christensen) – gathers memories, half-memories, descriptions of photographs, and family lore into a glossary—neatly arranged and cross-reference through the simple device of the alphabet—to explore the continued aftershocks of growing up in a family warped by violence and addiction

Dan Bernstein, Courting Secrecy: How a Little-Known California Newspaper and its Unlikely Lawyer Opened America’s Courtrooms to the Public (Bridget Barry) – the improbable story of a modest-sized Southern California newspaper and its lawyer, who took two cases to the United States Supreme Court in the 1980s, winning them both and establishing First Amendment rights that significantly expanded public access to the American judicial system

Chloé Delaume, Of Course Not (Alicia Christensen) – six psychiatric patients accused of murdering Dr. Black enact a life-size game of Clue as Chloé Delaume explores the effects of compromise in human life as well as contemporary literary production and consumption

Édouard Glissant, translated by Betsy Wing, Mahagony (Alicia Christensen) – a novel in three parts, Mahagony’s multiple narrators grapple with the history of slavery on Martinique and their place in the wider world

Susan Gubernat, Zoo at Night (Courtney Ochsner) – winner of the Prairie Schooner Book Prize in Poetry

Lee Martin, Telling Stories: The Craft of Narrative and the Writing Life (Alicia Christensen) – delineates practical techniques and tools with encouragement and advice to demystify the writing process to perfect the art of scene, characterization, detail, point of view,  language, revision, in short—the art of the writer’s life

Bison Books

Paul A. Johnsgard, Those of the Gray Wind: The Sandhill Cranes, New Edition (Bridget Barry) – a collection of stories that tell of the annual migration of the sandhill cranes from the American Southwest to their Alaskan mating grounds and then home again

Nancy Marie Mithlo, Knowing Native Arts (Matt Bokovoy) – brings Mithlo’s indigenous, insider perspective to understanding the significance of Indigenous arts in national and global milieus through engaging prose that illustrates how Indigenous artists express themselves to the wider world

Lisa Riggin, San Francisco’s Queen of Vice (Bridget Barry) – the story of the rise and fall of 1940s San Francisco abortionist Inez Brown Burns

Jewish Publication Society

Steven C. Reuben, A Year with Mordecai Kaplan (Joy Weinberg) –  first volume in the JPS Daily Inspiration Series invites readers to spend a year with the inspiring ideas of Mordecai Kaplan

Potomac Books

Martin Kitchen, The Dominici Affair: Murder and Mystery in Provence (Tom Swanson) – redefines one of France’s most puzzling crimes in the broader context of social, economic, and historical currents in post-war France

Michael Rose and Andrew L. Yarrow, Look Again: How Look Magazine Helped Shape America’s Post-World War II Consensus and How Mass Media Can Help Bridge The Nation’s Contemporary Divides (Tom Swanson) – examines how one of the most popular media outlets in U.S.history helped stimulate common dialog among elites and average citizens and enabled the nation to thrive in the quarter century following World War I

For scholars

Nebraska

Adrienne Edgar and Benjamin Frommer, Intermarriage in Eastern Europe and Eurasia (Matt Bokovoy) – brings together international and interdisciplinary scholarship to analyze interethnic and interracial marriage in Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, and Central Asia

Robert Jarvenpa, Declared Defective: Native Americans, Eugenics and the Myth of Nam Hollow (Matt Bokovoy)– an intriguing history of the mixed-race Native Americans named the “Nam” who originated from western New England, and a critical reevaluation of one of the earliest eugenics family studies, The Nam: A Study in Cacogenics, written in 1912 by the leading eugenicists Arthur H. Estabrook and Charles B. Davenport

Gabriela Aceves Sepúlveda, Mujeres que se visualizan: (En)gendering Archives and Regimes of Media and Visuality in post-1968 Mexico (Bridget Barry) – analyzes the fundamental and overlooked role played by a group of artists and feminist activists in developing and transforming regimes of media

Edgardo C. Krebs,  Alfred Metraux, The Morale Division: An Enthnography of the Misery of War (Matt Bokovoy) – focuses on Metraux’s participation in the “Morale Division” of the U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey in Germany and France during the final years of WWII and immediate postwar period

Christina Luckyj and Niamh J. O’Leary, The Politics of Female Alliance in Early Modern England (Alisa Plant) – twelve essays comprising political elements of female relations in literature from the period are identified, examined, and critically discussed

Lee C. Mitchell, Border Expectations: How Recent Westerns Read Us (Alicia Christensen) –  argues that the Western continues to engage us because recent films deliberately defy classic patterns yet still appeal to an implicit fondness for genre conventions

Anne O’Neil-Henry, Mastering the Marketplace (Alisa Plant) – traces the origins of contemporary mass-media culture through developments in the new literary marketplace of nineteenth-century France

Laura Westengard, Gothic Queer Culture: U.S. Queer Communities and the Ghosts of Insidious Trauma (Alicia Christensen) –  examines Gothicism in queer art, literature, and thought, Westengard argues that the 20th and 21st century has seen the development of a queer culture that challenges and responds to traumatic marginalization by creating a distinctly Gothic aesthetic