75 Significant Books, Part Four

PrintAs the largest and most diversified press between Chicago and California, the University of Nebraska Press is best known for publishing works in Native studies, history, sports, anthropology, geography, American studies, and creative works.

In celebration of the press’s seventy-fifth anniversary, the staff has selected seventy-five of the four thousand books UNP has published since 1941 to represent what is most distinctive and significant about our list. We have included books we originally published under the Nebraska imprint, the Bison Books imprint, the Potomac Books imprint, and the Jewish Publication Society collaborative agreement. When we have selected a book series we have listed the year the first book in the series was published.

Here are the next seven significant books, click here for the previous eight titles.

  1. The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition series (1983) by Gary E. Moulton. This complete set of the celebrated Nebraska edition incorporates the journals along with a wide range of new scholarship dealing with all aspects of the expedition, including geography, Indian languages, plants, and animals, in order to recreate the expedition within its historical context.
  2. Lord Grizzly (1983) by Frederick Manfred. Hunter, trapper, resourceful fighter, and scout, Hugh Glass was just another rugged individual in a crowd of rugged men until he was mauled by a grizzly bear and left for dead by his best friends. They never expected to see him again. But they did, and he was not just Hugh Glass any more. He was Lord Grizzly.
  3. Bang the Drum Slowly (1984) by Mark Harris. Henry Wiggen, hero of The Southpaw, became the best-known fictional baseball player in America. Now he is back again in Bang the Drum Slowly, throwing a baseball “with his arm and his brain and his memory and his bluff for the sake of his pocket and his family.”
  4. The Great Father: The United States Government and the American Indians (1984) by Francis Paul Prucha. Covering the two centuries from the Revolutionary War to 1980, the book traces the development of American Indian policy and the growth of the bureaucracy created to implement that policy.
  5. Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits (1984) by Marion Faber and Stephen Lehmann. First published in 1878, the book marks the philosophical coming of age of Friedrich Nietzsche. In it he rejects the romanticism of his early work, influenced by Wagner and Schopenhauer, and looks to enlightened reason and science. The “Free Spirit” enters, untrammeled by all accepted conventions, a precursor of Zarathustra. The result is 638 stunning aphorisms about everything under and above the sun.
  6. Karl Bodmer’s America (1984) by William J. Orr. Here, for the first time, carefully prepared and painstakingly reproduced, is the full range of Bodmer’s American work, printed in 359 plates, 257 in full color and 102 in black and white. Here, also for the first time, is the background needed to place Bodmer and his work in the history of his time, exploration, and the American frontier: his life, his American journey, and the subjects he painted and their contexts.
  7. The Kingdom of God Is within You (1984) by Constance Garnett. First published in Germany in 1894, after being banned in Russia, The Kingdom of God Is within You reveals Tolstoy’s world outlook after his conversion to Christianity. He argues that the kingdom of God is within reach of all.