SHAFR Preview

From June 21-23, the Sheraton Philadelphia Society Hill Hotel will welcome the 2018 annual meeting of SHAFR, the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. Potomac Books will have a table at the event spotlighting some of the most recent books on diplomacy, foreign relations, and more.

More than a Doctrine: The Eisenhower Era in the Middle East by Randall Fowler shows how the 1957 Eisenhower Doctrine Address influenced American foreign policy in the middle east and how that has influenced American policy in the present day.

Raising the Flag: America’s First Envoys in Faraway Lands by Peter Eicher tells the untold stories of America’s first diplomatic travels and the exciting, dangerous, sometimes disastrous first encounters with other nations.

Tough Sell: Fighting the Media War in Iraq by former George W. Bush administration appointee Tom Basile critiques the media coverage of the invasion and occupation of Iraq and argues about the administration’s inability to execute policy under critical coverage.

Diversifying Diplomacy: My Journey from Roxbury to Dakar is the firsthand account of Harriet Elam-Thomas, whose decades-long efforts as a woman of color distinguished her as a successful diplomat.

Not by Bread Alone: Russian Foreign Policy Under Putin by Robert Nalbandov covers how Russia’s foreign policy has changed since Vladimir Putin’s ascent to power in 2000 and how that strategy has reinstated Russia as a global superpower.

Harry and Arthur: Truman, Vandenberg, and the Partnership That Created the Free World by Lawrence J. Haas covers the relationship between President Harry S. Truman and Sen. Arthur Vandernberg as they work together across party lines in one of the most deeply divided times in the country’s history.

Lavi: The United States, Israel, and a Controversial Fighter Jet by John W. Golan details the controversial partnership between the United States and Israel to develop a groundbreaking fighter jet in what ultimately proved to be a metaphor for the relationship between the two nations.

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